About the Family

The Buzzaccarini (or Buzzacarini) are an aristocratic family padovana that had a prominent role in the history of the city between the XIV and the XVI century.

Related with the Carraresi, exercised a strong political power and contributed to the development of artistic and cultural heritage of the city starting from’age pre-renaissance. At the end of the Republic of Venice, a branch acquired the title of Venetian Patrician.

According to legend, the family name originated from the Roman gens Vetulia, from which derived the apellativo “de Vetuli” that often accompanies the surname. After losing sovereignty over the city of Cremona, they settled in Padua; a branch then moved to Pisa [2] .

In the Tuscan city existed, in fact, a Buzzaccarini family (or Buzzaccherini), one of the main branches of the large domus of Sismondi [3] and documents kept in the Chapter House of Pisa appears that the two families were unrelated to each other [4] . It must be said, however, that one of the first known members of the family would be the mayor of Vicenza Drudo Buzzacarini ( 1208 – 1209 ), coming from Milan [5] .

The presence in Padua of Buzzaccarini is attested only in its late period and emerged as a family Ghibelline ally to Romano. The aforementioned Drudo was a loyalist of Ezzelino II da Romano and during his rule confined to the scions of Milan Vicenza families hostile to him; He was then deposed by a conspiracy organized by from Vivaro and Maltraversi. In the same period amounted to Padua Buzzacarini two brothers, probably relatives of Drudo: Ugerio, law professor, and Salione, canon of the Cathedral of Padua and astrologer to the service Ezzelino III da Romano [5].

A good part of the fortune of Buzzaccarini, however, had to come from the practice of ‘ wear [5]. Became part of the ruling class in the fourteenth century , during the rule of the Carraresi [6], with whom they were closely linked following the marriage between Fina Patarus Buzzacarini and Francesco the Elder [7] [8]. Were among the most ardent defenders of the city during the war that opposed the Republic of Venice between 1404 and 1405 [8].

When Padua was finally subjected to the Serenissima, the family, while continuing to participate in public life, he proved intolerant Venetian exclusivist policy based oligarchy of patricians . All its members were involved in the revolt organized on the occasion of the War of the League of Cambrai : for a few months (May-July 1509 ), Padua was declared independent republic and gave out under the ‘protection of Emperor Maximilian [6] [9] [10].

The family was later linked to the Duchy of Mantua and the family Gonzaga, which was, in fact, closer to the Republic of Venice. In 1675 Aleduse Buzzaccarini was awarded by Carlo Ferdinando Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua and Monferrato , of the San Raffaele title of Marquis [1] . In 1706 , also, Antonio was formally adopted by the family Gonzaga and his descendants were able to postpone their surname to the ducal lineage [2].

In 1782 the Buzzacarini obtained the aggregation to the Venetian aristocracy, following the decision of the Great Council of ascribing to the Golden Book forty new families with the aim to swell the coffers of the State [11].

After the fall of the Serenissima, and the subsequent establishment of the Lombard-Venetian Kingdom, the Austrian imperial government, recognized the patent of nobility to the various branches of the family [2].

Notes
^ a b c Vittorio Spreti, Enciclopedia storico-nobiliare italiana, Vol. 2, Bologna, Forni, 1935, p. 217-218.
^ a b c Francesco Schröeder, Repertorio genealogico delle famiglie confermate nobili e dei titolati nobili esistenti nelle Provincie Venete, Vol. 1, Venezia, Tipografia di Alvisopoli, 1830, pp. 174-177.
^ Renato Piattoli, Sismondi, su Enciclopedia Dantesca, Treccani, 1970. URL consultato il 30 aprile 2014.
^ Réginald Grégoire, San Ranieri di Pisa (1117-1160) in un ritratto agiografico inedito del secolo XIII, in Biblioteca del Bollettino storico pisano, Vol. 36, Pisa, Pacini, 1990.
^ a b c Gérard Rippe, «Le bruit et la fureur»: la domination d’Ezzelino da Romano (1237-1256), in Padoue et son contado (Xͤ -XIIIͤ siècle), Vol. 36, Écoles françaises d’Athènes et de Rome, 2003.
^ a b Roberto Zepperi, Giovanni Buzzacarini, in Dizionario biografico degli italiani, vol. 15, Roma, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana, 1972. URL consultato il 30 aprile 2014.
^ Arcoano Buzzacarini, in Dizionario biografico degli italiani, vol. 15, Roma, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana, 1972. URL consultato il 30 aprile 2014.
^ a b Roberto Zepperi, Francesco Buzzacarini, in Dizionario biografico degli italiani, vol. 15, Roma, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana, 1972. URL consultato il 30 aprile 2014.
^ Roberto Zepperi, Aleduse Buzzacarini, in Dizionario biografico degli italiani, vol. 15, Roma, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana, 1972. URL consultato il 30 aprile 2014.
^ Sandra Olivieri Secchi, Ludovico Buzzacarini, in Dizionario biografico degli italiani, vol. 15, Roma, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana, 1972. URL consultato il 30 aprile 2014.
^ Dorit Raines, Cooptazione, aggregazione e presenza al Maggior Consiglio: le casate del patriziato veneziano, 1297-1797 (PDF), in Storia di Venezia – Rivista, I, 2003, pp. 2-64, ISSN 1724-7446. URL consultato il 15 giugno 2011.
^ Poesie in lingua rustica padouana di Bertevello dalle Brentelle, cioè madrigali, Bradamante irata. Isabella, e Zerbino. Orlando addolorato. Lamenti raccolti & imitati da’leggiadri canti dell’Ariosto. presso Daniel Bissuccio (in Venetia)